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Archive of posts filed under the Multi-Modal Transport category.

Multimodal Improvements Planned for Broadway, Lincoln

At the Community Workshop #2 held yesterday, the city revealed their recommended redesign for the Broadway/Lincoln corridor.

The highlights: a two-way parking-protected cycle track for Broadway and a dedicated transit lane on Lincoln.

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Image courtesy Denver Public Works

Image courtesy Denver Public Works

For complete details, please visit the DenverMoves-Broadway Community Workshop #2 page as well as the review and analysis by David Sachs at Streetsblog Denver.

Denver is heading in the right direction with these recommended changes by utilizing a portion of the public right-of-way for people who move about the city by means other than the automobile.


Broadway/Lincoln Community Workshop #2 is Today, January 28

The City of Denver, along with community members and transportation advocates, have been working on crafting a vision for improvements to Denver’s Broadway/Lincoln corridor to transform the streets from automobile-dominated thoroughfares to multi-modal livable streets.

In November, we reported on the Community Workshop #1, which laid out three options for how Broadway/Lincoln could be reconfigured to provide better pedestrian, bicycle, and transit uses in the corridor. David Sachs at Streetsblog Denver has been covering this issue thoroughly, and I agree with him that Option #3 is the best.

Option #3 for Broadway/Lincoln. Image courtesy City and County of Denver.

Community Workshop #2 is today, Thursday, January 28, from 3-8 PM at the South Broadway Christian Church, 23 Lincoln Street. Please stop by and let Denver’s planners know you support a multi-modal Broadway/Lincoln corridor!


You Can Be a Sidewalk Champion!

by Jill Locantore, WalkDenver Policy Director

Sign up today to help us build the momentum of the Denver Deserves Sidewalks campaign.

Imagine if you were responsible for filling the potholes in the street in front of your house. Not only would this policy place a significant financial burden on your household, but your ability to drive around safely would depend on other homeowners filling the potholes in front of their houses too. As ridiculous as this policy sounds, it is Denver’s current approach to sidewalk construction and maintenance. As a result, many Denver neighborhoods have missing, substandard, or deteriorated sidewalks, which makes it very difficult to get around safely on foot!

WalkDenver’s Denver Deserves Sidewalks campaign calls upon the City and County of Denver to assume responsibility for building and repairing sidewalks, and to establish a dedicated funding source for this purpose. To date, more than 2,200 individuals have signed the petition (online and hard copy), and nearly 30 organizations have provided letters of support. City Council has responded by establishing a Sidewalk Working Group, chaired by Councilman Kashmann, which will meet for the first time on January 27, 2016.

Now we need YOUR help to keep the momentum of Denver Deserves Sidewalks going and clearly demonstrate to City Council that residents want the City to provide this most basic infrastructure. The Sidewalk Champion Toolkit outlines several different ways you can help us get the word out and gather more petition signatures and support letters.

Your actions will not only help your neighborhood and your city become a more beautiful, walkable, and equitable place, but will also earn you great WalkDenver rewards!

  • Sign up to become a Champion and get a WalkDenver sticker!
  • Take one action from the Toolkit and get a WalkDenver tote bag!
  • Take three actions from the Toolkit and get a WalkDenver t-shirt!

Sign up today!


The Future Transformation of Wynkoop and 21st Streets

Wynkoop in LoDo and 21st Street in Arapahoe Square are very different urban streets. Wynkoop is resplendent with Victorian-era brick warehouses, strong urban form, an attractively streetscaped public realm, and civic icons like Denver Union Station. 21st Street? Surface parking lots and a largely incoherent urban form are the street’s defining characteristics. However, Wynkoop and 21st Street actually have an important attribute in common: neither are through-streets that provide vehicular connectivity beyond their extents, as both streets are capped at both ends by landmarks. Wynkoop terminates at Cherry Creek on one end and at Ballpark Plaza on the other. Similarly, 21st Street stops at Coors Field on one end and at Benedict Fountain Park at the other. This situation makes Wynkoop and 21st Street excellent candidates to be transformed into high quality bike/ped streets while still providing modest vehicular access.

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Diagram courtesy City and County of Denver.

Last night I and about 100 others attended a public meeting held by Denver Community Planning and Development and their planning consultant AECOM to review preliminary plans for such a transformation. Some of the big ideas include a two-block park within the 21st Street right-of-way near Larimer, converting Wynkoop in front of Union Station into essentially an extension of Wynkoop Plaza, creating a signature bike trail along both streets that could form the start of a bigger downtown loop, and reconfiguring the Broadway/21st Street intersection to provide a major mid-block bike/ped crossing of Broadway.

For more information, check out the city’s webpage on the project, and definitely check out David’s excellent overview at Streetsblog Denver.


City Celebrates Opening of New Downtown Protected Bike Lanes

Today, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, along Downtown Denver Partnership CEO Tami Door, Councilman Albus Brooks, and dozens of bicycle riders and advocates, celebrated the official opening of the protected bike lanes along Arapahoe and Lawrence streets in Downtown Denver. These new bike lanes are a big deal for creating a more equitable share of the public right-of-way among transportation modes. Now, bicyclists have their own dedicated portion of the street for safer passage through Downtown Denver and connecting to the Auraria Campus and the Curtis Park neighborhood.

It was a short but fun celebration under a sunny Denver sky, complete with the ribbon-cutting ritual:

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Thanks to DenverUrbanism reader Mike Huggins, here are a few nice shots of the Arapahoe bike lane from above—looking toward the Auraria Campus (left) and toward Arapahoe Square and Curtis Park (right):

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Back at ground level, here’s the finished version of the floating bus stop at 16th and Lawrence that I covered when it was still under construction in October:

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Up next for new protected bike lanes Downtown will be 14th Street, coming Summer 2016.