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Archive of posts filed under the Multi-Modal Transport category.

Photographic proof bikes and streetcars work together

Despite the fact that streetcar tracks can be hazards to cyclists, bikes and streetcars are great allies.

They both help produce more livable, walkable, less car-dependent streets. It’s no coincidence that the same cities are often leaders in both categories. In the US, Portland has both the highest bike mode share and the largest modern streetcar network. In Europe, Amsterdam is even more impressive as both a streetcar city and a bike city.

With that in mind, here’s a collection of photos from Amsterdam showing bikes and streetcars living together.

  
  
All photos from BeyondDC.com

Of course, it doesn’t just happen. It’s easy for bikes and streetcars in Amsterdam to avoid one another, and to interact safely, because each one has clearly delineated, high-quality infrastructure.

Chalk that up as one more reason to build both good bike lanes and great transit.


FasTracks Progress: Union Station

As I was out and about with my camera taking infill project photos for DenverInfill, I noticed something different about the north end of the commuter rail station at Union Station!

Recently, workers have been putting up the poles for the catenary wire system that will be used for the EMU trains. Electric (EMU) trains, with the overhead wire system, will be used for the Northwest, North Metro, Gold and East Line. Here are some photos!

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It’s very exciting to see all of the pieces start to come together!


A Call to Action: Pedestrian Advocacy on the Move

By Jill Locantore, WalkDenver Policy and Program Director

WalkDenver is working to make Denver the most walkable city in the nation, and recently launched a petition calling on our City officials to take two actions:

Form a Pedestrian Advisory Committee whose role will be to advise city officials, city agencies, and the office of the Mayor on policies, procedures, and infrastructure improvements needed to make Denver a great city for walking.

Establish Denver Moves Pedestrians, a parallel implementation plan to the bicycle-focused Denver Moves plan, so that the City has a clear path forward for improving the pedestrian environment in Denver.

These actions will build on the momentum created by two important milestones in Denver’s pedestrian advocacy movement: In April, Denver was nationally recognized with a “Gold” Walk Friendly Community designation, and in May, Kaiser Permanente awarded WalkDenver a substantial grant to support the organization’s grassroots advocacy work.

Walk Friendly Communities is a national program that recognizes communities working to improve walkability and pedestrian safety. WalkDenver’s dedicated volunteers collaborated with City’s agencies to prepare an extensive application focused on assessing Denver’s current transportation and land use policies.  This effort paid off when Denver received the Gold designation, one of just 13 cities that has achieved this status.  

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Pedestrians at Better Block Jefferson Park
(photo courtesy WalkDenver)

While the Gold designation signals that Denver is on the right track, the City still has work to do. The website WalkScore.com ranks Denver as the 17th most walkable large city in the U.S., behind other western cities such as  Los Angeles, Seattle, and San Francisco. The Alliance for Biking & Walking 2014 Benchmarking report ranks Denver 36th out of 52 large metro areas on per capita spending on pedestrian and bicycle projects. Similarly, a recent report on walkable urbanism from LOCUS ranked Denver 14th out of 30 metropolitan areas.

Now with a major grant from Kaiser Permanente, WalkDenver has grown from a primarily volunteer-based organization to a professionally-staffed advocacy group, and is poised to make significant progress toward improving the pedestrian environment in Denver. In addition to collecting petition signatures, WalkDenver is also gathering letters of support from partner organizations, as well as seeking individual and corporate sponsors for both its advocacy work and additional Better Block events.  

Join the effort by signing WalkDenver’s petition today!  For more information, visit the WalkDenver website, or contact WalkDenver Executive Director Gosia Kung at gosia.kung@walkdenver.org.

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A version of this post also appeared on WalkDenver’s blog at http://www.walkdenver.org/a-call-to-action-pedestrian-advocacy-on-the-move/


15th Street bike lane officially becomes a cycletrack

On May 21, Denver Public Works crews added plastic bollards to the buffer of the 15th Street bike lane, officially making it Denver’s first protected bike lane.

Protected bike lanes, or cycletracks, are becoming common in central cities around the US. Compared to normal bike lanes, cycletracks are safer, induce more people to bike, and increase business.


Photo from @DowntownDenver on Twitter.


Goodbye Market Street Station!

With the new Denver Union Station Transit Center now open, it is time to say goodbye to Market Street Station. The 30-year old station has served many transit riders including myself and I’m sure many of you have memories using this station throughout its legacy. Today we are here to say goodbye and take a look at some final photos before it becomes another memory in Denver history.

The outside of the station always had an interesting mix of architecture. From the 1970′s style waiting area mixed in with tents similar to Denver International Airport to chess pieces as benches, this plaza has always been a very unique sight. Also, did you notice 16M in the background? This intersection is going through many changes.

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For being a product of the 1970′s, these entrance buildings are still pretty sleek.

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Time to head down to the station! Unlike Chestnut Pavilion and Wewatta Pavilion, these are very narrow passageways with a narrow central staircase.

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Once you make it down, you are greeted with a very dark, green tinted great hall with very uncomfortable, round, granite seats. In the center, there is a ticket booth counter and restrooms in the back. Behind all of that, you will find Gate 5 in a nice, tucked away, easy to miss corner.

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When your bus arrives, the bus door is right up against the gate door. If you have any large bags, it’s going to be difficult to get them into the cargo compartments of the bus.

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No matter how dark, uncomfortable, and smelly Market Street Station was, it still held a lot of sentimental value to a lot of riders. Every wall in the station is covered with memories, and goodbyes to the station.

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Back outside, between the two entrances, you are greeted with the same uncomfortable, round, granite seats that skateboarders used more for tricks more than pedestrians for seating.

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And how can we ever forget the bright, red way-finders at each corner of the block?

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What’s next for Market Street Station? A pair of Denver developers have very high interest on redeveloping the block into a mixed use building or two, much like 16M. The only building that stays is RTD’s headquarters at 1600 Blake Street. For now, it’s goodbye Market Street Station!