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Colorado National Bank Hotel Conversion Final Update: Part 2

In Part 1 of our coverage, Ryan gave us a comprehensive overview of the grand opening of the new Marriott Renaissance Denver Downtown City Center Hotel that has been carefully crafted out of the historic Colorado National Bank building at 17th and Champa in Downtown Denver. In this post, we’ll add a few more photos of the project and some additional observations.

This project is a HUGE win for Downtown Denver. Take a classically historic building and transform it into a new hotel, with the modifications approved by the Denver Landmark Commission:

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This building was vacant for about a decade. Thanks to Stonebridge Companies and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority, this historic building was transformed into the beautiful building it is today. Here’s a photo of Councilman Brooks and others from the development team cutting the ceremonial ribbon on June 5, 2014:

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A few more images of the building at grand opening:

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If you haven’t yet checked out the inside of this awesome historic structure, featuring a stunning three-story atrium of white marble colonnades and a series of historic murals by Colorado artist Allen Tupper True, I highly recommend you do. The lobby bar and the hotel’s restaurant, Range, are fantastic.

While infill development is a big part of Denver’s growth as a city, adaptive reuse projects like the Marriott Renaissance Denver Downtown City Center hotel are equally important to Denver’s urban evolution and preserving its heritage as a major city.


Colorado Leads the Nation in Embracing, Regulating Ride-sharing Services

The controversy over ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft is well known, with national sites like CityLab reporting that states and cities both nationally and internationally are discouraging or even banning these companies from providing ride-sharing services as a viable transportation alternative in urban areas. 

Meanwhile, Colorado has taken a different approach. Recognizing that ride-sharing can be a smart and sustainable transportation option if properly regulated, Colorado has become the first in the nation to pass a comprehensive set of ride-sharing regulations that allow Uber, Lyft, and similar companies to succeed while providing reasonable safeguards for ride-sharing customers. The legislation, which passed with bipartisan support in the Colorado legislature, was signed by Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper on June 5, 2014.

The difference in attitude on this topic between Colorado and other states is stark, as is evidenced by Governor Hickenlooper’s signing statement on the new legislation: “Today, as we sign into law Colorado’s Transportation Network Company Act, we celebrate and affirm that Colorado is open for business as a place where entrepreneurs and tech-savvy innovators can thrive. We welcome UberX and Lyft and other ride-share companies that will provide Coloradans with an affordable and convenient new transportation option. Colorado once again is in the vanguard in promoting innovation and competition while protecting consumers and public safety.”

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(image source: http://blog.uber.com/regsdoneright)

Uber and Lyft echoed Governor Hickenlooper’s views on Colorado’s leadership in providing transportation options for its citizens. Lyft spokesperson Chelsea Wilson said: “By creating a common-sense regulatory framework for ridesharing that prioritizes public safety and consumer choice, Colorado has stepped up as a leader in welcoming innovative, community-powered transportation options and forging a path for other jurisdictions to follow.” Uber’s Eva Behrend added: “Colorado is on the cutting-edge of innovation and technology. Their leaders understand that laws should not stand in the way of consumer choice, innovation and the natural evolution of the way people travel; instead, they have proactively adopted commonsense rules to allow for technology to create safe, convenient and seamless new transportation options.”

Way to go, Colorado!


Adaptive Reuse: Colorado National Bank Hotel Conversion Final Update – Part 1

To kick of our first adaptive reuse final update, we are going to go inside the Colorado National Bank hotel conversion. Now known as the Renaissance Denver Downtown City Center Hotel, the hotel is now open and DenverUrbanism was invited to attend the grand opening event! In part one of our series, we will be looking at the interior of the hotel along with some of the grand opening festivities! Thank you to BrieAnn Fast of B Public Relations for making this inside look possible!

First off, as per our final update tradition, here are all of the previous posts for this project:

Colorado National Bank Hotel Conversion Underway

Adaptive Reuse: Colorado National Bank Hotel Conversion

Adaptive Reuse: Colorado National Bank Hotel Conversion Update #2

Adaptive Reuse: Colorado National Bank Hotel Conversion Update #3

Adaptive Reuse: Colorado National Bank Hotel Conversion Update #4 

Now for the look inside! Once you enter the building, you are greeted with a very large great hall, which used to be the lobby for Colorado National Bank. Many of the historic elements of the building, including the artwork, are still intact; giving the great hall a very historic feel with some modern hints throughout.

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The mezzanine level is accessible with hotel rooms lining the entire length of the hallways.

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The hotel rooms have various floor plans, ranging from small studios to multi-room suites. Each room has a modern style finish with either hardwood or carpet flooring.

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Throughout the main floor and lower level, there is ample, not to mention comfortable, seating for all of the hotel guests. Since this is an old bank building, the vaults on both floors have been converted into conference rooms, my personal favorite feature of the whole project. Some of the vault rooms are very intimate while others are quite large and open.

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The hotel comes with a full fitness center on the lower level. Here’s a fun fact: anything to the right of the blue beams is under the sidewalk; the lower level extends just past the property line along Champa Street!

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Last but not least, the hotel features a full restaurant and bar on the lobby level.

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The outcome of this conversion is incredible and we couldn’t have asked for anything better! Coming up next, additional grand opening coverage and a final look at the exterior of the building!


15th Street bike lane officially becomes a cycletrack

On May 21, Denver Public Works crews added plastic bollards to the buffer of the 15th Street bike lane, officially making it Denver’s first protected bike lane.

Protected bike lanes, or cycletracks, are becoming common in central cities around the US. Compared to normal bike lanes, cycletracks are safer, induce more people to bike, and increase business.


Photo from @DowntownDenver on Twitter.


City Loop, Take II

After much public debate, an energetic group of local citizens recently came together to put the kibosh on a proposed park redevelopment in City Park called “City Loop.” For those of you who are unfamiliar with the project, it was (in the words of Denver Park’s and Recreation staff) “intended to be a new, multi-generational activity and play area that would replace the existing Dustin Redd playground, which is in need of significant repair or replacement after nearly 20 years of use. The goal behind the current City Loop concept is to create a new area that gives everyone using the park—from small children to older adults—an opportunity to remain active and enjoy a healthy lifestyle.” For more info on the project, you can follow this link to the city’s web page on City Loop.

For the purposes of this blog post, I don’t want to get into the controversy behind the City Loop proposal at City Park but, rather, to urge the city to give this concept another try in an area of the city where it’s wanted and desperately needed. In the wake of the demise of the initial proposal, Councilwoman Susan Shepherd and Councilman Paul Lopez have been working with local neighborhood groups to ask the Parks department to reinvent the concept in Paco Sanchez Park. Never heard of Paco Sanchez Park? That’s precisely one of the reasons for this proposal. Unlike City Park, this park is relatively unknown and underutilized. It is also situated in a neighborhood where there are a great deal of low-income families with children who could easily access the park by foot, by bike and by rail. The following is a Google Earth aerial photo of Paco Sanchez Park.

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Paco Sanchez Park, named for a local Hispanic activist and radio broadcaster, is located in Lakewood Gulch between Federal Boulevard and Knox Court on Denver’s west side. The brand new West Line cuts right through the middle of the park; in fact, it would completely sever the park in two if not for a new pedestrian bridge that was built as part of the light rail construction. The park is part of an extensive bicycle corridor that connects west-side residents to the Platte River and is book-ended by two light rail stations. Bus lines run down Federal and Knox Court making this park accessible to virtually every mode of transportation this city has to offer (except B-Cycle, but that could come later).

With the exception of the light rail bridge, some bike path and storm drainage upgrades needed for the light rail project, and a highly successful Frisbee golf course, the park has not seen substantial investment in decades and could seriously use an update. The park is utilized, but not to the extent that it could be, because there is not much in the way of programming and because some of the facilities that do exist are deteriorating. While there hasn’t been much investment in the park in recent history, there is beginning to be a great deal of reinvestment in the neighborhoods surrounding the park; plans are in the works to revitalize the Sun Valley neighborhood and its DHA housing project to the east, and a new mixed-use development with a new public library is being built a block to the north (link). While City Park could certainly use additional maintenance and investment, I personally think bringing the City Loop concept to a less beloved park, which is in greater need of investment and activation and is in a neighborhood that is transitioning into a denser transit-oriented neighborhood, makes a great deal of sense. Let’s see what this might look like.

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The photo on the left is the proposed City Loop concept for City Park taken from the city’s website. In the image on the right, I’ve taken this concept, overlaid it (relatively to scale) on top of Paco Sanchez Park and made some slight modifications to make it work in this park (I’ve also taken the liberty of giving it a bit of a filter, so it looks more conceptual). While there would need to be significant modification to the plans due to topography (it is in a gulch after all), the concept of a looping trail with multiple interactive playground nodes could work very well here. The concept would greatly help to tie the two halves of the park together allowing for more interaction from one side of the gulch to the other, and since the “loop” is centered on the light-rail line (crossing over it twice), the park could really celebrate transit as part of the experience.

There are a few other reasons I think this is a great idea and should be implemented (and I do hope Lauri Dannemiller of Denver Parks and Recreation is reading this). First, there are a very large number of ethnically and racially diverse, low-income families with children in the Sun Valley, West Colfax, Villa Park and Barnum neighborhoods who would have direct access to this park via, foot, bike, bus and train. These kids can’t necessarily afford to go to Elitch’s and don’t have the luxury of being driven to nicer suburban parks with new modern playgrounds, spray pads and the like. This could be a great place for them to be kids, to explore and be active. It could be their amusement park. What’s more, many of these kids are at risk for obesity, and the health risks associated with it. This new concept with a walking loop and multiple play areas would help keep these kids more active and healthy (and it could help their parents too).

Second, I think the park could become a real jewel in what is already a nice green necklace of parks that cuts through the west side of Denver. Finally, there has been much concern among long-time locals about the strain that new development around Sloans Lake Park may put on that park. I firmly believe that creating another destination park within the general vicinity would ease some of the pressure off that already well-used and beloved park. I do hope that the city parks department shares the opinions of Councilwoman Shepherd and Councilman Lopez and seriously considers this proposal. I think it could really be a win-win for the neighborhoods surrounding Paco Sanchez Park and for the City of Denver as a whole.