Skip to content
Archive of posts filed under the Revitalization category.

14th Street Ambassador Corridor Improved by Renovation at 414 14th

Recently I was able to get a peek inside the former Denver Public Schools Administrative Building at the corner of 14th Street and Tremont in the Central Business District.

2015_4_7_41414th

This gorgeous building, now known as 414 14th Street on the Ambassador, was originally erected in 1923 for the Denver Public School system and housed their offices until the 1970’s. It was added to the City and County of Denver’s list of historic landmark buildings in 1994. Most recently, it served as offices for the Denver Art Museum.

The Downtown Denver Partnership has designated the 14th Street corridor the “Ambassador Street” because of its proximity to sites popular for out-of-towners, such as the Colorado Convention Center and the Performing Arts Complex. The building’s prime central location on the Ambassador Street, along with its historic importance, caught the eye of owners Dunkeld-14-LLC (a partnership that includes principals from Hyder Construction). They closed on 414 14th in 2013 and with the help of DURA financing, they are in the midst of performing an impressive renovation.

Redeveloped on spec, Dunkeld-14 is now seeking tenants through Pinnacle Real Estate Advisors to fill this 43,000 square foot office space. Tenants could potentially lease the entire building, or subdivide the three floors into multiple offices. Though many of the original building’s details are being restored (like the stairwell and hallway pictured below) each lessee will have the rare opportunity to select their own finishes.

2015_4_7_41414th_2

2015_4_7_41414th_1

Though the owners are not currently seeking LEED certification, the building is being adapted to meet LEED-Silver standards. Negotiations with Xcel Energy have resulted in a brand new electrical system, with a state-of-the-art transformer vault installed at the rear of the building. High speed fiber-optic cable was added, and the interior features a brand new variable refrigerant flow (VRF) HVAC system that offers up to 35% in energy savings because of its ability to allow for zoned thermal control in large spaces.

2015_4_7_41414th_4

All of the 150-some original windows were sent out of state to be professionally insulated and glazed, preserving the original character of the building while bringing it up to today’s energy-efficient standards. Lower level bike storage and shower rooms will cater to the cyclists in the city, while 42 dedicated parking spaces at the rear of the building are an undeniable bonus for potential tenants.

The 3-story building was originally shaped like a U, with the open space facing the rear. Dunkeld-14 has added an impressive secondary entry alcove to this space that adds over 6,000 square feet to the original building footprint.

2015_4_7_41414th_5

With its unique blend of modern technological improvements and historic 1920’s charm, 414 14th is sure to be snapped up soon. We’ll check back in for an update when the renovation is complete.

Thanks to Jeff Caldwell at Pinnacle Real Estate Advisors for the tour!


Turntable Studios Brings Micro-Apartments to Denver

MARCH 5 UPDATE: JG Johnson Architects has finalized the renderings for Turntable Studios.  The three photos posted below include the final sign design and color scheme for the building.

view1_w-logo

view2_w-logo

view3_w-logo

———————————

Denver’s first micro-apartment building is under construction! The project is called Turntable Studios, and its introduction to Denver’s rental housing mix marks an important step toward expanding the affordable housing options for would-be city dwellers.

TURNTABLE

courtesy of JG Johnson Architects

Micro-apartments (also called micro-units or micro-housing) have been part of the housing mix in dense international cities like Hong Kong and Tokyo for decades, but they are just starting to catch on in the U.S. Though the maximum square footage varies depending on the source, most authorities consider a one-room apartment unit that is between 150-350 square feet to be “micro.”

There is a reason that micro-apartment development is on the rise. According to a 2012 report from the U.S. Census Bureau, the proportion of single-person households in America has increased by 10% from 1970, and presently accounts for more than a quarter of all households. This rise in single-person households coupled with steadily increasing housing prices has created a new real estate market segment that appears quite willing to sacrifice square footage for affordable rents and desirable urban locations.

Though the concept has not yet reached Middle America, fast growing cities like Boston, San Francisco and Seattle have been offering micro apartments for several years now. Their introduction to the rental market has presented a challenge to city planning departments, who have no previous experience guiding policy decisions that speak to the unique housing arrangement that places kitchen components within mere feet of sleeping quarters. Nevertheless, the demand for affordable urban units in the U.S. is undeniable and Denver will soon have its first offering, courtesy of Nichols Partnership.

Probably best known locally for developing the Spire condominium building downtown, Nichols Partnership is in the midst of adapting the former VQ Hotel building next to Sports Authority Stadium at Mile High into 179 apartment units that will range in size from 330 square foot studios, to 820 square foot 2-bedroom units.

Originally erected in 1967, the 94,000 square foot, 13-story cast-in-place concrete structure stands out because of its unique design. It is shaped like a silo, with the elevator bank at its center and 16 hotel rooms per floor spoking out from the circular hallway.  Each of these rooms is being converted to an apartment unit, complete with a kitchen (featuring full-sized refrigerators and built-in microwaves), a full bathroom with a sliding barn door, and living / sleeping area.

02-06-2015_Turntable_1

Because of the limited square footage, the unit floorplans had to be carefully arranged. Nichols Partnership  tested the design with a real-life mock-up unit, to ensure the spaces were laid out to maximize livability for the future tenants.

turntable studios bed

Courtesy of Nichols Partnership

The windows are being re-glazed and each unit will feature a Juliette balcony, so that tenants can open up their doors and enjoy their remarkable view of downtown Denver.

02-06-2015_Turntable_2

Turntable Studios will offer a variety of amenities, such as a fitness room, swimming pool, and community room on the first floor, along with additional storage space for tenants.  The hotel’s former top floor restaurant space will be converted into penthouse apartment units and a common area. The development prioritizes access to multi-modal transportation, with plans for 144 covered bike racks, and its proximate location to I-25 and two light rail stops.

Property management company Boutique Apartments is already accepting inquiries for the project, which is scheduled to begin leasing in June, 2015.

Be sure to check back for updates, as we will certainly be keeping an eye on the development of this exciting new addition to Denver’s housing mix! Thanks to Melissa Rummel and Jodi Kopke for the tour!


Montessori Academy of Colorado Renovates Ideal Laundry Building

The Montessori Academy of Colorado (MAC) elementary school recently completed phase one of its multi-million dollar restoration of the Ideal Laundry building in historic Curtis Park.

2015-01-29_MAC_1

With the help of New Markets Tax Credit Loans (a federal program designed to stimulate economic growth in low income urban neighborhoods by providing private investors in Community Development Entities with tax incentives), and the Denver Office of Economic Development, MAC was able to finance a renovation that nearly doubles the usable square footage within the building.

Occupying nearly half of the 2500 block of Curtis Street, the Ideal Laundry building has been a prominent fixture in the Curtis Park neighborhood for over one hundred years. According to a 2010 Application for Landmark Designation to the Denver Landmark Preservation Commission, the building was initially erected in 1910 as a laundry facility where artesian well water was pumped on site. The building changed ownership several times over the years; additions were made, interior walls were erected and dismantled, and exterior doors and windows were boarded up and then uncovered again.  The photo below is from the Denver Public Library’s digital collection, taken in 1988 when the building was home to a watering hole called Eric’s Pub.

Ideal_Laundry_close_up_of_sign

Adapting an historic industrial facility for use as an elementary school is a complicated venture.  Since they purchased the building in 2007, MAC has replaced the outdated HVAC system, the roof, and the smoke detection and alarm systems. This most recent renovation converted spaces like the one pictured below into several new classrooms, a library, art and music rooms, a small kitchen, staff lounge and conference room.

2015-01-29_MAC_2

Though the interior of the building is being completely upgraded, MAC has managed to preserve some of the original character of the building, as you can see in the photo of the windows of the infant care room below.

2015-01-29_MAC_3

Phase two of MAC’s renovation (“Future Phase” on the Slaterpaull Architects rendering below) is scheduled to begin later this year and will include a media center, gym, and rooftop garden. Many thanks to Abby Hagstrom, Jaclyn Greenbaum, and Nancy James for the tour!

Montessori_floorplan_board_small


Industry Denver Accelerates River North Revitalization

By Liz Munn

If you’ve been to the River North (RiNo) neighborhood lately, you may have noticed that INDUSTRY at 29th and Brighton Boulevard is buzzing with activity. Located in the former Denargo Market area that once housed over 60 food vendors and wholesalers circa WWII, 3001 Brighton Boulevard is now the anchor for an ambitious redevelopment project that brings office spaces, restaurants, and residential living to the nine-acre site.

Here is a photo of the revitalized warehouse building taken from the other side of Brighton Boulevard:

2014-11-05_IndustryFacade

The interior features 120,000 square feet of shared office spaces that range in size from a single desk to 5,000 square feet. The development took place in two phases, with every space leased before construction was even completed. The lessees are predominantly creative-tech companies, such as Uber, who is the anchor tenant for Phase 1 of the development. Companies share a café, dining area, a few kitchens (one of which always has a keg on tap), common areas and conference rooms.

Here are a few photos of the building’s shared spaces:

2014-11-05_IndustryHall

2014-11-05_IndustryKitchen

2014-11-05_IndustryEntry

2014-11-05_IndustryCommonArea

The building’s original skylights were restored, allowing abundant natural light to brighten what could have been a shadowy and cavernous warehouse space.

2014-11-05_IndustrySkylights

Industry’s north-east side currently houses Tengu, a noodle shop. Two more restaurants, The Griffin and Will Call are currently under construction and slated to open for business within the next couple of months.

Though the redevelopment of the former market is almost complete, construction is far from over at the Industry site. Phase III is currently under way, a building that combines three floors of parking with two floors of office space, expected to be complete by early 2015. Eventually, the parking lot that currently sits to the north of the building will be razed and replaced with townhomes.

Here is a rendering of the completed development, courtesy of Industry:

2014-11-05_IndustryRendering

Check the DenverInfill blog in the future for updates as the new infill phase at Industry gets underway.

~~~

Liz Munn grew up in the shrinking city of Cleveland, Ohio, holds a B.S. in Sustainability from Washington University in St. Louis and is currently a Master of Urban and Regional Planning candidate at the University of Colorado Denver. She is pursuing a professional career in urban development, with a special interest in brownfield revitalization, infill and adaptive reuse projects.


West Colfax Mobility Improvement Project Completed

This past weekend, the West Colfax Business Improvement District (WCBID) celebrated the near completion of a mobility improvement project on West Colfax Avenue between Federal and Sheridan Boulevards. The project, which has been in planning and development for nearly three years, includes new pedestrian-scale signage, seven artist-designed bus shelters and entry monument signage on both ends of the corridor. The project aims to encourage pedestrian traffic and mass transit use on West Colfax and throughout the surrounding neighborhood by connecting people to local parks, light-rail stations and other destinations such as the new Denver Library branch set to open on West Colfax in early 2015.  All aspects of the project incorporate the WCBID’s logo therefore helping to create a brand for the up-and-coming West Colfax corridor. The “W” logo can be seen on the entry monument shown in the photo below.

2014-10-22_Entry Monument1w

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funded by the Denver Office of Economic Development the new signage, bus stations, and branding is also intended to help jump start additional redevelopment along the corridor. Together with bicycle signage also being installed throughout the neighborhood, these new elements form a wayfinding system that is designed to comprehensively connect pedestrians and bicyclists to neighborhood assets. Together with the bus shelters, these directional signs and enhanced transit amenities support WCBID’s efforts to encourage pedestrian and bike transport in West Colfax and create a more healthy, dynamic and  interactive community culture that will support local businesses.

While this project certainly isn’t as monumental as the recent reconstruction of 14th Street downtown or as pretty as improvements to South Broadway or North Tennyson Street, for example, there is certainly something unique to be seen here. I believe that the exciting thing about this project (unlike so many other pedestrian improvement projects) is that it anticipates the pedestrians rather than simply acknowledging an existing pedestrian presence. As it exists today, there is very little pedestrian traffic on West Colfax, but with new developments coming online including Mile High Vista at Colfax and Irving and the redevelopment of the St Anthony’s hospital, there is potential for more pedestrian traffic in the near future. Additionally, acknowledging and enhancing what little pedestrian traffic is already on the street goes along way toward encouraging more pedestrians to make their way onto the corridor. Putting just a few more people in front of existing businesses and empty storefronts just might be the ticket that sparks additional redevelopment.

Here’s a closer look at the components.

2014-10-22_Signage1w

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The wayfinding signage (above) and entry monuments designed by Tom Rodgers with Hyperform Design Cooperative (as part of a larger master plan for the corridor executed several years ago) are designed to reflect the rich history of mid-century “Googie” signage on Colfax Ave while also giving the corridor a bold modern look. The entry monument on the east end (pictured earlier) replaced an existing, but tired, welcome sign located at Colfax and Irving, while on the west end of the corridor, Dan Shah of the WCBID somewhat miraculously managed to convince the Walgreen’s corporation to mount an identical sign on the concrete wall surrounding their parking lot at the intersection of Sheridan and Colfax. The wayfinding signs are located on both sides of Colfax Avenue and occur on nearly every block throughout the corridor. They help to continually reinforce the theme set up by the entry signage.

2014-10-22_Orange Bus Stop 2014-10-22_Bus Stop Detail

The bus shelters, designed by local artist Emmett Culligan, also pay homage to the mid-century modern car culture with their unique “inflated” stainless steel columns and bright colors (as seen in the pictures above). Each of the seven shelters is painted a different color of the spectrum and has matching plexiglass panels. As you travel down West Colfax from east to west the stations are placed in spectral order from red to purple. Interestingly enough, however, the shelters aren’t actually new. In order to complement the WCBID’s other sustainability goals (you can see the solar streetlight in the photo above) the BID and the artist worked with RTD to refurbish and place seven identical bus shelters along the corridor. This was no easy task as only three of the shelters already existed on West Colfax. In order to create the rest of the set, RTD and the BID swapped out three non-matching shelters from West Colfax with matching shelters elsewhere in the system and pulled one more matching shelter out of storage. A pretty amazing feat if you ask me. Once the refurbished shelters were placed on site, the artist simply mounted his inflated stainless steel tubes to the corners of the existing shelter to finish off the new look (the “inflated” tubes are made by blowing compressed air into extremely hot steel to create the “air-stream” like forms).

So next time you’re traveling by on West Colfax (in whatever transit mode you happen to be taking) check out the new bus shelters and wayfinding signage. And maybe (if you’re so inclined) linger a bit and imagine a fully revitalized corridor complete with shops, restaurants, new housing and, most of all, healthy and sustainable pedestrian street life. It’s not so much of a distant future.