The Business of Urbanism: Platt Park

With a strong downtown, the surrounding neighborhoods will thrive.  A recent example of this is the Platt Park neighborhood. It has been a strong neighborhood for a long time, but as of late there are many new businesses and buildings breaking ground from one end to the other.

On a recent walk through the neighborhood I saw a whole series of new businesses, either just opened or very close to opening. There is the recently relocated Sushi Den, Steam, 5 Green Boxes (in a new location), Izikaya Den, a new Tavern, and a brewery set to open next year.

Steam: A great new coffee house

   

Izakaya Den

In terms of new development, it is mostly located in the Northern end of the neighborhood both north and south of Mississippi.  Currently, one major set of buildings is under construction and ground has broken on what could be as many as three new developments.

Just about to break ground South of Mississippi

New construction next to Duffeyroll

Platt Park is presently one of hottest spots for retail, residential and new restaurants.  Talking with the neighbors they both enjoy this and are frustrated by the increased attention on the neighborhood. In the past the bars and restaurants were closed early, but this may change as more and more people choose to spend their evenings hanging out on Old South Pearl. One of the other issues coming to light is the lack of parking. Spots that have normally been taken by the neighbors are now being used for customers and this is causing issues for both residents and business owners.  An interesting idea that I think has merit is to bring the pedicabs from downtown and have them run through the neighborhood. It could really connect the neighborhood and lessen the burden on parking off of Pearl St.

Having visited Old South Pearl Street for years, I am excited to watch the development. It is great to see new buildings sprout up and see what new businesses pop up to support the growing community.

By | 2016-12-27T21:12:03+00:00 November 27, 2013|Categories: General Urbanism, Transit-Oriented, Transportation, Walkability|Tags: |2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. @denver_luv November 28, 2013 at 9:19 am

    this makes me wish we still lived in a city of trolleys.

  2. Bryan December 1, 2013 at 8:30 am

    why is parking a concern? this is an alley-neighborhood…so each home has a minimum of 25′ to park in the back of their home, or in an alley-garage. the street is really for everybody…this concept of ownership of the public-domain should be squashed, or at least counteracted with logic.

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